feeds | grep links > EFF on IP Enforcement Bill, Nerdcore Flow, Smartphones as Key Cards, and More

  • EFF weighs in on COICA IP enforcement bill
    Richard Esguerra provides analysis that echoes that of Wendy Seltzer, to which I linked yesterday. He augments her arguments about censorship, adding concerns about how interference with the DNS system could cause problems and the signal this bill would send with regards to the US’s stance on internet censorship. The latter point is interesting because the bill, if passed, would contradict, in actions, what the State Department put into words with Clinton’s speech several months back.
  • Scribd apologizes, clarifies archive option that optionally results in paywall
    Via Hacker News.
  • Google crowd sources efforts to fix invalid metadata in Books, The Register
  • BBC coverage of Nerdcore
    Via Hacker News. I have been listening to MC Frontalot quite a bit lately, especially his latest album, “Zero Day”. Not surprisingly, I was thrilled to see this BBC piece which I take as a good sign that Nerdcore is still alive and well. Even if the main stream media here is a couple of years late.
  • Smart phones as a replacement for hotel key cards
    Mike Melanson at ReadWriteWeb explains how one chain is experimenting with the idea, clearly driven by convenience over security. Do I need to count the number of ways this system will be that much more vulnerable than the existing key cards? To the credit of the hotel chain trying this idea, they are making it optional. Given the addition of the phones’ processing power, there is an opportunity to actually make the system much more secure. As much as past history is a valid predictor, the implementers are unlikely to be pushing the security envelope as far as the hardware would enable.
  • Federal guide to spying on your suspected terrorist neighbors, Wired
  • Brain coprocessors, Technology Review

feeds | grep links > Faster JavaScript for Firefox 4, Details of Google’s New Search Index, Leaked EU Surveillance Plan, and More

Following Up for the Week Ending 8/22/2010

TCLP 2010-08-15 News

This is news cast 222, an episode of The Command Line Podcast.

In the intro, letting everyone know Dragon*Con is coming up. I’ll be taking a little more time this year off from the show to prepare for my travel there. There will be no news cast on either September 29th or the 5th. There will be no feature cast on the 1st and possibly the 8th, depending on what recordings I come back with and how much work they need.

This week’s security alerts are first Android SMS trojan and a vulnerability in OpenSSL 1.0.

In this week’s news artificial life evolves a basic memory, John Doe who challenged the FBI freed to speak, touch screens open to smudge attack, and the state of 3D printing. The book I mention in the a-life segment is “Complexity” by Mitch Waldrop.

Following up this week just the announcement of what Google and Verizon were up to. There was an op-ed from the two CEOs though I don’t think it added anything. There was also a ton of analysis and commentary though I am going to recommend that from EFF’s Cindy Cohn. Not surprisingly, Google has already posted a defense.

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feeds | grep links > Schmidt Steps in It Again, Acting Against Broadening of the CFAA, Automate News Site Digg is Gamed, and More

Following Up for the Week Ending 8/1/2010

feeds | grep links > Data Sorting World Record, Reining In DMCA Takedowns, and More

  • Data sorting record: 1TB, 1 minute
    HT [si]dragon.
  • Latest in Perfect 10 case rejects sloppy takedown notices
    As the EFF explains, this is a small victory in shifting the burden back onto those issuing complaints. The post has some background on the case against Google as well as the clarification by the judge on shoddy, poorly constructed requests being insufficient to prompt a takedown. The even better news is the ruling on some of the notices is not unique though it certainly adds weight for future judicial consideration.
  • FTC wants browsers to block online tracking
  • White House seeking expansion of National Security Letters
    Slashdot links to a Washington Post article explaining the sought after broadening of an already problematic executive power. The White House wants to add “electronic communication transactional records” to the data that can be collected, without a warrant, under one of these letters. Unfortunately, that term is legally vague, not being clearly defined in the relevant laws.

TCLP 2010-07-18 News

This is news cast 219, an episode of The Command Line Podcast.

In the intro, an admission of a mistake around correctly observing the licenses of some works I used after I stopped using the non-commercial clause in the license for the podcast. The net effect should be none to you, the listener, but it seemed like a good teaching moment and a reminder that as easy as Creative Commons makes it to understand their licenses, that doesn’t prevent making honest mistakes. Thanks, Randal.

This week’s security alerts are Mozilla blocking an add on that was nabbing passwords (via ZDNet) including how the backdoor was discovered and a crack that could affect libraries used to implement OAuth and OpenID.

In this week’s news Android App Inventor, in keeping with Google’s spirit of developer inclusion vs. Apple’s puzzling decisions, promises creating apps without coding though some interesting questions remain, a comic book on digital civil rights in Europe produce by EDRi among others that I think would be a good companion to Cory Doctorow’s “Little Brother“, NSA whistle blower exhausted all official channels to raise a complaint, and consider the question of search neutrality and whether co-opting the rhetoric of net neutrality is wise.

Following up this week European ACTA negotiators update the EP in secret and ACTA is coming down to a fight between the US and the EU.

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feeds | grep links > Open Source Hardware Definition, Autonomous Helicopter, and More

Sorry that this is it for today, I am rushing off a bit early to catch a public talk at Google’s DC office.

TCLP 2010-07-11 News

This is news cast 218, an episode of The Command Line Podcast.

In the intro, thanks to new donor, Scott, and a request that existing donor Ryan contact me so I can send him his merit badge. Also, there will be new feature cast this week. I need to catch up on writing features for the show and I will be attending two events in DC this week: What Does Light Taste Like and Decoding Digital Activism.

This week’s security alerts are researchers form collective in response to Microsoft’s dismissal of a security concern and REMnux, a linux distro designed for reverse engineering malware.

In this week’s news new quantum states could lead to new approaches to quantum computing, the Apache web server conquers the world, another constructive criticism of transparency, and the NSA is looking to implement domestic surveillance of our infrastructure though they are quick to deny any active monitoring.

Following up this week, two UK ISPs are taking the Digital Economy Act to High Court.

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