feeds | grep links > DuckDuckGo Launches Tor Hidden Service, Wikipedia Experiments with P2P for Video, and More

feeds | grep links > Carrier Claims Right to Censor SMS, Wireless in Dangerous and Remote Areas, Wikipedia’s New Article Feedback Tool, and More

Apologies once again for a sparse link dump. Spent a good portion of today’s allotted blogging time hacking on tjhe second of three scripts critical to completing the migration of my podcast production entirely to Linux. More posts on the problems and solutions I’ve developed soon.

feeds | grep links > Desktop 3D Scanner, 64-Bit Flash for Linux, Diaspora Releases Source Code, and More

Another day of light posting between mental heavy lifting while coding for $employer and burning much of my usual end of day hour on a personal hacking project. The latter is an itch that had started to drive me insane, automating my podcast feed management to both reduce the amount of manual work around that task in my podcast work flow and to move the step entirely over to Linux. I’ll post more details of how I manage this later, including links to source.

  • Makerbot 3D scanner
    Bruce Sterling at Wired points out a new offering from the desktop printing and home fabrication innovators at Makerbot, a desktop 3D scanner. While it is likely to have similar limitations as its printer counterpart, it along with free and open source 3D design software completes the trifecta for not just ginning up your own tangible parts and goods but to designing and customizing them in the first place.
  • 3D printing commercial air craft parts, Make
  • IBM patents choose your own adventure movies, Slashdot
  • Adobe releases 64-bit Flash, including Linux version
    I’ve only had some minor trouble with Flash under Linux but this beta, as Slashdot points out, should eliminate all kinds of jiggery-pokery most 64-bit Linux users have to go through. I wish we didn’t have to keep supporting Flash, either with official builds or via free and open one offs but for online video it is still effectively king.
  • Diaspora releases source code
    The link is directly to their site which also includes a simple screen shot. I haven’t had time to download and test but have read elsewhere that this is really pre-alpha quality code. I would suggest holding off unless you are willing to help test and maybe even send along patches.
  • Law suit over another post-cookie tracking technique, Wired

feeds | grep links > Mozilla Inserts a Stability Beta, How-to Read a Patent, Babbage’s Debugger, and More

Apologies for the paucity of posts today. I am feeling brain drain from a technical presentation at the $employer today. And my mind is still spinning on re-working my audio workflow under Linux now that my mixer is working.

Following Up for the Week Ending 9/12/2010

feeds | grep links > Broadband as Voting Issue in Australia, CERN’s Changing Patent Policies, More on European Police Raids of ISPs, and More

Following Up for the Week Ending 9/5/2010

Microsoft Co-Founder Fires a Patent Broadside

Paul Allen’s company, Interval, holds four patents against which they are filing complaints against eleven high profile technology companies. The list, not surprisingly, doesn’t include Microsoft.

The patents revolve around three main concepts: browser use for navigating through information, managing a user’s peripheral attention while using a device, and alerting users to items of current interest. They collectively address the general concept of presenting searched-for information to a user along with related news articles, media (such as music or videos), status updates from friends, or data (such as stock or weather info).

As Jacquie Cheung points out, this move is very consistent with the practice of patent trolling. Interval, like other ventures by Allen, doesn’t really produce anything yet still holds several patents. The suit is based solely on holding these patents, not on any actual inventions produced and sold.

Hopefully the suit will be thrown out. Most of the claims seem pretty obvious, obviousness being a foil to patents. Much will depend, of course, on the timing of the patents. What seems obvious now may not have been when the applications were made.

Microsoft cofounder drops patent bomb on Apple, Google, Facebook, Ars Technica

feeds | grep links > RIAA Says DMCA Not Working (Hard Enough for Them), Jury Invalidates EFF’s Top Patent, Proposed Apple Spyware Goes Too Far, and More

  • Apple seeking to patent spyware and traitorware
    I have to agree with the incredulous tone in EFF’s analysis of Apple’s patent application. This goes well beyond anti-theft measures, none of the included techniques are worth it for a phone no matter how expensive or the risk of a breach of personal info. Simple encryption would be a more suitable solution for the latter and insuring the device if it is that important the former. I am really far more concerned about the potential privacy implications than Apple using this as some sort of spite based DRM to increase the pain of jail breaking a device despite it now being authorized under the DMCA section 2101 rulemaking.
  • Jury invalidates one of EFF’s “Most Wanted” patents
  • Google Marketplace DRM cracked
    As the Register explains, the break was relatively simple predicated on the ease of de-compiling Java bytecode. To be more specific, as they clarify if you read the article, the DRM itself actually has not be broken but the application code that uses the simple affirmative or negative response from the platform can be re-engineered to essentially ignore the secure check. Each app would then have to be broken in turn but the break would hold for all copies of the cracked version.
  • The RIAA may have hurt its own arguments against innocent infringement
  • RIAA pushing to eliminate DMCA safe harbors
    Mike Masnick at Techdirt does an excellent job digging out what might otherwise be a confusing claim made in the course of this story, that the RIAA doesn’t think the DMCA is working. Clearly, what they think is a failure is the small and flawed free speech safety valve of safe harbors from liability for ISPs. Their reasoning tends to the absurd, that because the trade association cannot monitor enough traffic to reach whatever its current goals are in curbing infringement through DMCA takedown requests, they think the law should be re-written to directly deputize ISPs to do their enforcement work for them.

feeds | grep links > Chrome Store Opens to Developers, Flash in Java, P2P Users as Innocent Infringers, and More

  • Google opens Chrome app store to developers
    The Register has more details on a move from Google that has been puzzling me. From their description, what “installing” a web app in Chrome will do is allow a traditional web application to customize Chrome’s, er, chrome with its own icon and such as well as getting some higher privileges to access the browser’s resources. I suppose the security implications aren’t very different from other kinds of add ons, many of which already integrate with web services. I do wonder if the lower barrier to entry than a proper extension might make auditing for securing harder just because of increased volume.
  • Java based Flash player
  • Legal analysis of Oracle v. Google
  • SCOTUS told P2P users can be “innocent infringers”