New Version of Ogg Theora Open Video Codec, The Latest in The Security Debate Over Chrome Frame Plugin, and More

  • Ogg Theora 1.1 release
    Thanks to Mike Linksvayer for sharing this link on Identi.ca. There is a lot of details and samples in the announcement. The best part is that the 1.1 codec is fully backwards compatible, so no need to re-encode anything, either for existing 1.0 players or to upgrade for software that will use the new version.
  • Google’s rebuttal to MS claims over security issues in Frame
    Google seemed to target earlier versions of Internet Explorer in their remarks, while Microsoft earlier was talking about the most recent. I tend to give Google more credit here, considering the large proportion of folks still using MSIE 7 and even 6 and the truly abysmal security in those vintages coupled with Microsoft’s almost entirely absent support.
  • Clever response to Lily Allen’s anti piracy remarks
    Cory shares a video that remixes one of Allen’s songs with some creative lyrics detailing a very coherent, considered criticism of her earlier remarks on her blog and in response to Techdirt’s own criticisms.
  • Obama finally fills IP czar appointment
    According to Wired, both sides of the debate seem satisfied with the appointment of Espinel, a teacher as well as former adviser to Congress and to the USTR. She has the endorsement from Public Knowledge which tells me she has had a balanced view of the issues around infringement, enforcement and consumer rights at least in her past roles.
  • A view from the pro-business method patent side on Bilski
    PJ invited comment from those support business method patents to comment on the possible outcomes of Bilski. Worth the read to understand all sides of the debate and really to understand that the world won’t come unhinged no matter how the appeal is ultimately decided.
  • AU rolling out “unhackable” netbooks into schools
    This really smacks of a large PR stunt, one aimed at trying to get Windows 7 more traction on both the government and the education markets. I don’t care how much benefit you extend to security improvements in Windows 7, calling any software unhackable is disingenuous at best.