Following Up for the Week Ending 9/5/2010

Digital Economy Act Could Spur More “Pirate” ISPs

The launch of Pirate ISP by the original Pirate Party clearly has the members of the UK Pirate Party thinking. Specifically, they expect that the Digital Economy Act may encourage smaller ISPs to crop up that also resist turning over customer data and do not retain logs.

You would think that refusing to play along with the new law’s deputization of service providers would already be out of bounds but there is apparently a loop hole related to the size of the provider.

However, the Ofcom proposals only apply to large ISPs, which the [UK] Pirate Party says will drive mid-size ISPs to break into smaller companies which fall outside the rules – creating a wave of so-called “Pirate ISPs” in the UK.

The prediction is not that unlikely. In other countries, like South Korea and France, where three strikes rules have come into play, file sharers have managed to route around those responsible for enforcing disconnection. The party specifically anticipates existing ISPs will hive off into smaller operations which also seems more likely than spinning up entirely new services, like the Swedish party did.

Digital Act to Create Pirate ISPs in UK via Slashdot.

TCLP 2010-07-11 News

This is news cast 218, an episode of The Command Line Podcast.

In the intro, thanks to new donor, Scott, and a request that existing donor Ryan contact me so I can send him his merit badge. Also, there will be new feature cast this week. I need to catch up on writing features for the show and I will be attending two events in DC this week: What Does Light Taste Like and Decoding Digital Activism.

This week’s security alerts are researchers form collective in response to Microsoft’s dismissal of a security concern and REMnux, a linux distro designed for reverse engineering malware.

In this week’s news new quantum states could lead to new approaches to quantum computing, the Apache web server conquers the world, another constructive criticism of transparency, and the NSA is looking to implement domestic surveillance of our infrastructure though they are quick to deny any active monitoring.

Following up this week, two UK ISPs are taking the Digital Economy Act to High Court.

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Following Up for the Week Ending 7/4/2010

Following Up for the Week Ending 5/9/2010

TCLP 2010-04-11 News

This is news cast 211, an episode of The Command Line Podcast.

In the intro, thanks to new donor this week, David.

This week’s security alerts are a new site collecting privacy and security info on apps and services and a vulnerability in WebKit’s handling of the blink tag.

In this week’s news reverse engineering facial recognition to develop dazzle camouflage (a story I also wrote up on the web site), asking whether IBM broke its open source patent pledge with their response and clarifying commentary from a couple of knowledgeable folks, a new memory management technique that could boost performance for multiple cores, and contending format shifting a book you own is ethical with supporting and dissenting responses.

Following up this week court rules against FCC in Comcast case barring neutrality regulation on ancillary authority but not through other means and the Digital Economy Bill has been passed including what we should do now.

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Following Up for the Week Ending 4/11/2010

Digital Economy Bill is Passed

Now the UK can claim bragging rights for having the worst digital copyright law in the world, instead of us here in the US. Yay for them.

Seriously, this is terrible news. I crack wise to keep from weeping in frustration for my friends and acquaintances who now have to live with this horrible legislation.

Mike Masnick at Techdirt is the first among my feeds to report the story though I saw it on Twitter just a bit before that. Masnick does a very thorough job of explaining just how much of a mockery of democratic process the passage was. Dissenting voices were squashed and erroneous, largely made up facts were cited. A vague promise to fix the bill’s problems after the coming election was promised. We all know how that story ends. It is very unlikely any reform effort will be launched, let alone an effective one.

I suspect that Mike is also right in his conclusion that a few months time will see this law having little to no effect on the health of the entertainment industry in Britain. In the wake of Hadopi, France’s three strike law, piracy actually increased. Of course, industry lobbyists probably see that as justification for the powers granted by clause 18 of DEB, the ability for the government to amend copyright further outside of the legislative process. As Masnick notes, even though the clause itself was dropped, its contents still made it through to passage.

The worst, if Mike is right, is considering the question of what the entertainment industry will try next If three strikes fails to shore up their struggling business model. Zero tolerance? Precognitive law suits? You knew that this ratcheting up of copyright doesn’t have a stop, right?

I do wonder if this most aggressive expansion of copyright yet will provide some real world substantiation to Jessica Litman’s hypothesis that overreaching copyright may result in the audience considering it illegitimate. That outcome would be a shame because a more functional copyright system often does what is intended, providing incentives for creators to create. Abandoning copyright altogether isn’t a good idea for anyone, not the creators, the intermediaries or the audience.

Following Up for the Week Ending 4/4/2010

TCLP 2010-03-28 News

This is news cast 210, an episode of The Command Line Podcast.

In the intro, thanks to new donors this week, Rhonda and Jonathan. Also a very quick update on the badge experiment.

This week’s security alerts are attackers using attack-in-depth and security alerts for Gmail.

In this week’s news a detailed proposal for copyright reform, a side channel info leak despite web encryption, Chris Soghoian and Sid Stamm publish a paper on SSL spoofing and EFF proposes some means to deal with it, and considering whether math skills are essential for programmers.

Following up this week constitutional concerns over ACTA and the Digital Economy Bill is set to go to vote without further public debate.

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