2015-12-19 The Command Line Podcast

old-newspaper-350376_1280This is an episode of The Command Line Podcast.

I will be attending SCALE in the latter half of next month if anyone else planning to be there wants to meet up.

I am also thinking about attending this year’s LibrePlanet, in March. Please consider donating to their scholarship fund to help attendees who might not otherwise be able to go to join the event and learn more about Free Software and the community that uses and supports it.

This time, I chat about some recent news stories that caught my attention, including:

You can subscribe to a feed of articles I am reading for more. You can follow my random podcast items on HuffDuffer too.

You can directly download the MP3 or Ogg Vorbis audio files. You can grab additional formats and audio source files from the Internet Archive.

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

2015-10-31 The Command Line Podcast

This is an episode of The Command Line Podcast.

This time, I chat about some recent news stories that caught my attention, including:

Also, I am considering attending Scale in the latter half of January. Whether I go or not, you should check the event out.

You can subscribe to a feed of articles I am reading for more. You can follow my random podcast items on HuffDuffer too.

You can directly download the MP3 or Ogg Vorbis audio files. You can grab additional formats and audio source files from the Internet Archive.

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

2015-10-10 The Command Line Podcast

newspapers-444447_1920This is an episode of The Command Line Podcast.

This time, I chat about some recent news stories that caught my attention.

You can subscribe to a feed of articles I am reading for more.

You can directly download the MP3 or Ogg Vorbis audio files. You can grab additional formats and audio source files from the Internet Archive.

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

TCLP 2014-12-13 Interview: Cory Doctorow, “Information Doesn’t Want to be Free”

Information Doesn't Want to be Free: Laws for the Internet Age book coverThis is an episode of The Command Line Podcast.

In this episode, I interview Cory Doctorow about his latest book, “Information Doesn’t Want to be Free: Laws for the Internet Age.” If you are interested in learning more about the topics we discuss and that book covers, you can also check out books by the scholars we mention: Lawrence Lessig, James Boyle and William Patry. I compared Cory’s book to “The Indie Band Survival Guide” the authors of which are friends of the show whom I have also interviewed.

The audiobook version of the book is already available. Check Cory’s site, the free download and electronic editions should be available soon.

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You can grab the flac encoded audio from the Internet Archive.

Creative Commons License

Nina Paley’s Kickstarter: Mimi & Eunice Mini-books

Judging from Nina’s pitch video, she has run afoul of one of the limitations I’ve been hearing about Lulu’s otherwise wonderful print-on-demand service–an inability to set pricing below a set floor. Kickstarter fits the bill nicely for her to experiment with an alternate, almost throwback, approach of capitalizing something more like a traditional print run. Her goal is modest and pitching in at the higher levels can net you some nice rewards. I love my signed copy of “Mis-information Wants to Be Free” and am eager to add a signed mini-book to my special collection shelf.

Nina very neatly works into her pitch an educational aspect to the project. She has worked with Question Copyright in the past to develop some catchy, sticky memetic media that cram key ideas about free cultural sharing and against over-aggressive copyright into your ear like a didactic ear worm. The notion of pulling a mini-book out of your pocket at appropriate venues to that same end is appealing–at least to me. I’d actually love to be able to have a handful of these at events where I speak specifically about copyright. Judging by the eventual retail price she’s trying to reach, that’s the very idea, cheap enough to give away.

My First Kickstarter Project! Mimi & Eunice

Copyright Protest and Parody Song, “Death of ACTA”, Taken Down

Mike Masnick at Techdirt has the gory details of Dan Bull’s “Death of ACTA” song being taken down from the file locker service, Mediafire, one of the many ways Dan distributes his works on his own. Masnick undertook the difficult job of trying to parse a take down letter that was not exclusive to Bull’s work on Mediafire.

Dan was kind enough to forward on the takedown message… and it’s a total mess. There’s simply no useful info in it other than that a French company called TF1 wants the file (and a bunch of others) off of Mediafire as quickly as possible. Now, it’s not clear what the issue is here, but it’s not difficult to take a guess. “Death of ACTA” is obviously a play on Jay-Z’s “Death of Autotune” Jay-Z’s song features prominently a sample of the song “In the Space” by French film composers Janko Nilovic and Dave Sarkys. It’s quite likely that Jay-Z licensed the sample. Not surprisingly, Dan Bull did not, but that’s the nature of creating a parody song.

Masnick also reminds us that the EU (Dan himself is in the UK) doesn’t have fair use laws as such making a parody defense difficult. I interviewed Dan recently and he knows full well his works often exist in a troublesome legal gray area. He also doesn’t rely on only a single means to offer his songs and videos to fans. More likely this take down will serve as an opportunity to highlight the idiocy that the song itself speaks to in copyright law rather than interfering with Dan’s ability to produce his art and connect with his fans.

I would love to see Dan, or perhaps one of his creative fans, create a meta-rap about the takedown of the rap complaining about the overreach of intellectual monopoly like poorly justified takedowns.

‘Death Of ACTA’ Song Taken Down In Copyright Claim, Techdirt

Act Now Against Latest Rushed, Secret Trade Agreement

EFF is calling for folks concerned over the constant ratcheting of copyright maximalism to speak out against The Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement.

[The] trade agreement currently being negotiated by the United States and eight other countries: New Zealand, Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Chile, Malaysia, Peru, Singapore, and Vietnam. Like previous U.S. free trade agreements, the TPP includes a chapter on Intellectual Property. Based on previous U.S. free trade agreements like the U.S.-Korea FTA, it is likely to export controversial parts of U.S. Copyright law like the DMCA’s ban on circumventing digital locks without any of the exceptions and limitations that have enabled technological innovation, user generated content and education, to flourish in the U.S.

It may be tempting to see this as less of a concern than ACTA, to which EFF compares it. The negotiating parties are quite a bit different even if TPP is being discussed under the same veil of secrecy and on just as rushed, if not more so, a timetable.

The risk with intellectual monopoly enforcement being crafted absent the public interest in any trade agreement is that once some new rules or powers gain a toehold anywhere, they inevitably make their way into future such negotiations. EFF has a laundry list of the enforcement measures tabled by the US, often the main instigator for increasingly broad, over reaching enforcement.

Read through the list and see if the prospect of these measures becoming the international standard bothers you as much as it does me. If so and any of your elected representative are on the two relevant Congressional committees, please use the provided form to act.

Don’t Let TPP Become the New ACTA: Contact Your Lawmakers and Demand Transparency! EFF

Join Letter Against Irish Copyright Censorship Amendment

The P2P Foundation has a letter drafted by Saor Cultur Eire (Free Culture Ireland) in protest of the latest draconian legislation being snuck into law in Ireland. The letter includes links for more information, among them the BoingBoing story that brought it this development to my attention. If you live in Ireland, read the letter and consider signing on. If preserving cultural creation is the desired outcome, online censorship and disconnection regimes are provably not the right means to effect it.

In response to rushed amendments to Irish Copyright law, P2P Foundation