2015-12-19 The Command Line Podcast

old-newspaper-350376_1280This is an episode of The Command Line Podcast.

I will be attending SCALE in the latter half of next month if anyone else planning to be there wants to meet up.

I am also thinking about attending this year’s LibrePlanet, in March. Please consider donating to their scholarship fund to help attendees who might not otherwise be able to go to join the event and learn more about Free Software and the community that uses and supports it.

This time, I chat about some recent news stories that caught my attention, including:

You can subscribe to a feed of articles I am reading for more. You can follow my random podcast items on HuffDuffer too.

You can directly download the MP3 or Ogg Vorbis audio files. You can grab additional formats and audio source files from the Internet Archive.

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

2015-11-15 The Command Line Podcast

old-newspaper-350376_1280This is an episode of The Command Line Podcast.

This time, I chat about some recent news stories that caught my attention, including:

You can subscribe to a feed of articles I am reading for more. You can follow my random podcast items on HuffDuffer too.

You can directly download the MP3 or Ogg Vorbis audio files. You can grab additional formats and audio source files from the Internet Archive.

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

2015-10-31 The Command Line Podcast

This is an episode of The Command Line Podcast.

This time, I chat about some recent news stories that caught my attention, including:

Also, I am considering attending Scale in the latter half of January. Whether I go or not, you should check the event out.

You can subscribe to a feed of articles I am reading for more. You can follow my random podcast items on HuffDuffer too.

You can directly download the MP3 or Ogg Vorbis audio files. You can grab additional formats and audio source files from the Internet Archive.

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

2015-10-17 The Command Line Podcast

This is an episode of The Command Line Podcast.

This time, I chat about some recent news stories that caught my attention, including:

And a special shout out for listener Kevin who just launched a Kickstarter campaign for Trans*Geek Movie. Please help spread the word and consider becoming a backer.

You can subscribe to a feed of articles I am reading for more.

You can directly download the MP3 or Ogg Vorbis audio files. You can grab additional formats and audio source files from the Internet Archive.

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

2015-10-10 The Command Line Podcast

newspapers-444447_1920This is an episode of The Command Line Podcast.

This time, I chat about some recent news stories that caught my attention.

You can subscribe to a feed of articles I am reading for more.

You can directly download the MP3 or Ogg Vorbis audio files. You can grab additional formats and audio source files from the Internet Archive.

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

More on Dan Bull’s “Bye Bye BPI”

enigmax at TorrentFreak posted some background informing why Dan Bull undertook his latest crowd sourced video. In a nutshell, the UK high court has ruled against The Pirate Bay in a recent case brought by several labels, an outcome that will hurt the majority of smaller, independent artists that use the platform for promotion and distribution.

A block of The Pirate Bay will not discriminate – all content will be blocked, infringing or not, and artists relying on the site to reach their fans will be unjustly penalized.

Just hours ago and after working throughout the night, UK artist Dan Bull finished his latest track which was inspired by the recent TPB ruling.

TorrentFreak got a quote from Bull that resonates with the message of the song as well as speaking to the unintended harms to innovation in the tech sector.

“The BPI claim to represent the interests of musicians like myself and the people in my video, but the fact is that only the very elite few at the top of the music business will see a benefit. The rest of us are having our internet censored and are being ushered into an age of guilt until innocence is proven,” Dan told TorrentFreak.

“The tech sector is being damaged in order to prop up a comparatively tiny and irrelevant industry which the vast majority of musicians have absolutely no need for.”

Pirate Bay Block Inspires Crowdsourced Song – Bye Bye BPI, TorrentFreak

Bye Bye BPI, Latest Protest Song from Dan Bull

Dan Bull, British hacktivist rapper, has another protest video out. This one is addressed to Jeff Taylor, of the British Phonographic Industry, the trade association representing the record labels in that country. Bull makes a point that seems to be increasingly common, that the traditional intermediaries in the music industry are simply becoming more and more irrelevant. Wathc for yourself.

This is the second recent video that Dan has crowd sourced by putting a post on his Facebook account asking for volunteers. I missed the first one but you may recognize the bald, bespectacled podcaster around the 1:25 minute mark.

It is astonishing how fast he assembles these videos, from that first call to distributing the lines he wants each person to capture right on through to the finished product. In the case of the subjects this pair of videos cover the volunteer participation really drives the message home that much more, especially considering he got far more offers judging by the number of comments on the original post than he could possible use unless he did something like a single letter per person. The quotes he includes from Stephen Fry, Thom Yorke and Joss Stone, among others, don’t hurt either.

I am still waiting for a best of Dan Bull’s protest song album. Might have to be a double album at this rate.

A Few Final SOPA/PIPA Links for Consideration

As you may well imagine, the sites from which I usual cull my blog fodder have either been out of action or focusing exclusively on the pleas against SOPA and PIPA during this day of protest (as have I.)

In lieu of my usual curation of stories, even a minimal link dump, here are a few more posts worth reading about SOPA and PIPA.

PJ at Groklaw has a pretty good summary of the day’s events, as the sunset sets (at least here on the East Coast.)

Kevin Marks offered via Techdirt a translation of some of the latest frothy blatherings from current MPAA chief and former Senator Dodd. I honestly see visions of him dictating this, neck veins bulging and flecks of spittle flying from his lips. I am a bit galled that he has the temerity to call an “abuse of power” the actions of site and network service operators defending themselves from the very existential threat he has been championing through incredibly deep pocketed lobbying.

That’s not the end of it, either. Also on Techdirt, Mike Masnick relays how the MPAA is now trying to downplay the web wide blackout, claiming no large sites participated. Google? Wikipedia? Yeah, those are inconsequential. Even among technology enthusiasts and early adopters, clearly no one has ever heard of them.

And finally, Lauren Weinstein wonders what happens when the banners come down and the lights go back on at all the the protesting sites. Joe Brockmeier at ReadWriteWeb poses similar questions about how we sustain vigilance against bad ideas advanced by those whose bank balances outstrip any sense they might have of the greater public good. Alexis Madrigal at The Atlantic touches on many of the same questions, drawing parallels to other movements and how to encourage focus, break out of the technology centric echo chamber and sustain momentum.

All are worthy thoughts to bear in mind as we tally our victories and lick our wounds, returning from whence we respectively came. Tha may be the usual state of apathy about issues that are admittedly not the easiest to understand. Or it may be the near constant apprehension I know I am not alone in feeling over what lunatic scheme Hollywood will try next rather than engaging in a meaningful dialogue about real means of protecting and bostering cultural creation without damage the very public whoser heritage it is.

Hopefully a few people, at least, were informed enough by today’s events to perhaps to be lead through greater awareness to that latter group, being more mindful than before of what is at stake when seemingly obscure legislation like SOPA and PIPA is next proposed.

Human Readable Explanation of the Problems with SOPA/PIPA

Mitchell Baker, head lizard wrangler for Mozilla, has a very clear post for those still struggling to understand the problems with the proposed SOPA and PIPA legislation. As maker of the Firefox browser and a very active organization in shaping many new developments on the web, Mozilla has a huge stake in the outcome.

I like Mitchell’s analogy of a store. While not perfect as the costs of altering virtual directories and digital maps is different than their physical counterparts, the overall absurdity of trying to legislate around a blatant pirate site is no less absurd.

The solution under the proposed bills is to make it as difficult as possible to find or interact with the store. Maps showing the location of the store must be changed to hide it(1). The road to the store must be blocked off so that it’s difficult to physically get to there(2). Directory services must unlist the store’s phone number and address(3). Credit card companies(4) would have to cease providing services to the store. Local newspapers would no longer be allowed to place ads for the video store(5). And to make sure it all happens, any person or organization who doesn’t do this is subject to penalties(6). Even publishing a newsletter that tells people where the store is would be prohibited by this legislation(7).

Her conclusion is also compelling to me, that SOPA and PIPA are ill timed as the world of online content is heavily in flux. The implication is that many of the solutions we might consider would be bad fits, not just DNS blocking and the other measures in these bills. She admits room as well for those that prefer to make user of existing, traditional business models where an author prefers to limit access and use a per-per-view model.

PIPA/SOPA and Why You Should Care, Lizard Wrangling