Open DPI, OpenID, Open Invention and More

  • Vendor opens part of its DPI implementation
    Nate Anderson at Ars takes a look at the actual details of the vendor’s announcement. The open source edition doesn’t include any of the code for examining encrypted protocols. It is also clearly nothing but an attempt to use the open information to address customer concerns. That’s good as far as it goes but it isn’t the implementation that’s an issue, I think, but ISPs’ desires to use such privacy invading technology.
  • The fed adopts OpenID for some of its services
    There’s no timeline mentioned in the Wired article, but this is good news regardless. Not only is the list of sites due to rollout limited, but so is the number of providers. You won’t be able to use any OpenID provider. However the move may encourage other services that maybe are on the fence about the standard.
  • OIN picks up some ‘Linux-related’ patents from Microsoft
    Some smart speculation from Matt Asay on The Open Road. I would say even if the patents would not have been useful for MS to troll by proxy, having more software patents in the hands of OIN is a safer move, just on principle, for open source and free software.
  • Crypto tools to keep you hidden on Facebook
    I wish we didn’t need such tools. These look like a good approach, especially that personal information can be stored on an external server so any trusted sharing happens outside of Facebook.
  • Anonymous tries a DDoS attack against Australian government
    According to Wired, their announcement is not surprisingly prompted by the governments repeated attempts to implementing filtering of internet access. It looks like the government’s IT may have taken down, and kept down, the sites being targeted.