TCLP 2010-06-09 Free Yourself: Open Source Software for Everyday Use

This is a feature cast, an episode of The Command Line Podcast.

I will save listener feedback for the next show.

There is no hacker word of the week this week due to the length of the feature.

The feature this week is the second of two panel recordings I captured at Balticon 44. The panel was titled, “Free Yourself: Open Source Software for Everyday Use”. My co-panelists were Brad Smith and none other than Eric Raymond. I found ESR to be especially fascinating on this panel, with some thought provoking ideas and fun stories.

There are no detailed show notes for this show. You can grab the flac encoded audio from the Internet Archive.

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

TCLP 2010-06-02 Art, Music and Literature in the Age of Digital Reproducibility

This is a feature cast, an episode of The Command Line Podcast.

I will save listener feedback for the next show or the one after that.

There is no listener feedback this week due to the length of the feature.

The feature this week is the first of two panel recordings I captured at Balticon 44. The panel was titled, “Art, Music and Literature in the Age of Digital Reproducibility”, and was a fantastic, far ranging discussion. My co-panelists where Norm Sherman of The Drabblecast, Dave Slusher of Evil Genius Chronicles, Phil Rossi, and Dan Tabor of Geekadelphia.

There are no detailed show notes for this show. You can grab the flac encoded audio from the Internet Archive.

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

Dragon*Con 2009, Day 2

I had the early volunteer shift again Saturday (and will have it again Sunday). I moderated both panels during my shift.

I was incredibly nervous on the first one and chose to stand with a wireless mic and act more to prompt the panelists and pass the mic as needed. The panel was on making your podcast sound better. The panelists were George Hrab, Slau, and Patrick McLean. Two incredibly talented musicians and one of the finest story tellers in podcasting in my opinion.

I appreciate and am flattered by my friends who thought I was an equally qualified panelist but when it comes to audio engineering, I am a dabbler. I do only as much audio engineering as is required to make my show of the quality to which I prefer listening. That happens to be a pretty high bar but I do not think it compares to folks who make their living via audio and/or performance. The skills that I do possess and have developed to an comparably advanced degree weren’t applicable to the topic at hand.

That being said, I was tickled to finally hear what is usually a commonly asked questions panel for podcasters actually cover the mechanics of vocal performance in a way I can apply to what I do. And to hear solid emphasis placed on being passionate and interested in your topic well above and beyond gear, tips and tricks. There was plenty of the latter, too, but the discussion was incredibly well balanced.

I was considerably more comfortable on my second panel. It was the third time for my copyright discussion panel. I was lucky enough to get almost all of my usual suspects from years past. Once again, I was surprised and delighted not only by the turn out for an early morning panel on what can potentially be a very dry subject, but by the excellent questions brought by the audience. Also as with prior iterations of this panel, we ran out of time before we ran out of conversation which I consider a good criterion for a successful panel.

In the afternoon, I finally managed to catch up with friends over lunch. We fought past the insane line for Patrick Stewart to the food court then had to deal with the peak time for the lunch hour. All things considered, we didn’t have to wait too terribly long for a table to free up. The line for Kameel’s was long but moved briskly. I introduced a few more friends to my favorite vendor in the food court, too.

After lunch, the group broke up a little bit with the majority of us heading into one of the three dealers’ rooms to explore. There were definitely some impressive wares on display, maybe a bit better than last year, but so far nothing I felt suitable for bringing home to the boys. Hopefully, I’ll manage to hit at least one of the two remaining rooms and can find something they might like.

The group broke up further still and I got to spend a couple of hours with Chooch and Viv as well as better introducing them to my room mates. They had laready met but briefly at the Technorama live show, Friday night. Viv was even a contestant in the Stump the Geeks segment (she was the only one who stumped us–rawr). Chuck and Kreg left to see Adam Savage and the plan was for the three of us left to play some Pandemic. After chatting for a while, we switch the plan to Monthy Python Fluxx, it being quicker to play. We never did play either game, we had such a good time just talking. As much as we all gather to spend time with our friends, the insanities of the con usually mean actually doing so is the exception far more than the rule.

This year’s Parsecs had an impressive turn out. The steering committee and MCs did an excellent job, improving on the ceremonies on almost every point over last year. The pacing was excellent and the whole affair just felt much more tightly crafted. This despite the one or two unavoidable but easily forgivable glitches. Mostly notably, due to poor scheduling, the wonderful Pamela Gay of the Astronomy Cast was late almost to the point of the program being altered on the fly to route around her absence. She literally ran from the other end of the con, however, and managed to pull off her part of the event, the giving away of several Galileo telescopes, with grace and humor, followed by presenting awards for two categories.

A large group of us gathered for dinner, after, and put up with incredibly loud karaoke waiting for enough tables to clear to seat us all in reasonable proximity. I enjoyed dinner, both for the company and the food. Metro Cafe Diner is one of my favorite spots outside of the immediate con environs.

After dinner, I was graciously invited back to Chooch and Viv’s room, which they share with P.G. Holyfield and Patrick McLean, for a sort of impromptu Parsec losers party. Again, a good con moment, the ones that if you search for them too hard, you never find them. When you stop, relax, and just sort of open up to the possibilities of the con, they just happen. Lots of great jokes, stories, and even the birth of a collaboration between Kim the comic book goddess and Patrick.

As much as I wanted to linger, I made my farewells and headed back to my hotel. My roomies were already asleep but left a night light on for me. (We’re all techies, we do not lack for LEDs and LCDs that serve quite well as impromptu low level light sources.) As responsible as I was being leaving my friends early, now I am feeling a rare bit of insomnia, perhaps brought on by the first bouts of homesickness. Spending so much time with Chooch and Viv actually reminds me of my own family waiting for my return in a few days.

I am hoping part of my lack of drowsiness is my promise to Andrea that I would post often. By filling that promise for the second day of the con, maybe I’ll be able to lay my head down and get some rest before I have to get up, hopefully for another day of unlooked for moments of that elusive social joy particular to conventions.

Chooch’s Experiment with Google Voice

If you listened to the Technology: Podasting’s Rocket Fuel panel audio from Balticon 43, you’ll have heard Chooch and I discussing an experiment in automatic transcription using Google Voice. Wouldn’t you know that Chooch actually tried it out and documented his results. It doesn’t look like he was entirely successful but he is open to suggestion for alternatives that may work better. I still would like to see Google open up their transcription capabilities further so that we could see a more capable audio search engine as well as other novel applications for audio and video podcasters.

TCLP 2009-06-10 Balticon 43: Copyright

This is a feature cast.

In the intro a correction and a reminder about my upcoming 4th anniversary show.

There is no listener feedback this week. There is also no hacker word of the week due to the length of the feature.

The feature this week is the recording of the Copyright panel at Balticon 43. I was joined by Thomas Vincent, a former congressional staffer and known amongst podcasters for his work on the upcoming Parsec Awards for this year.

There are no detailed show notes this week.  You can also grab the flac encoded audio from the Internet Archive.

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

Balticon 43 Panel Audio

I have recordings for three more panels that aren’t as relevant to my podcast but that I promised to share. I encoded these as FLAC audio and posted them to the Internet Archive. Their media system recognizes FLAC and has already re-encoded my original uploads as both MP3 and Ogg Vorbis.

The panels are:

The Internet Archive pages for each has the relevant details about the panels and the license, CC BY-SA 3.0 US, for each. I will also warn you that this is the raw, unedited audio without any noise reduction. That was my motivation for posting them as FLAC audio, which is a lossless format, so if you want to edit and clean up the audio to us under the license terms, you have the highest possible quality to do so.

One other note, because they are encoded in a lossless format, the file sizes are quite large, around 400GBMB each. If you just want to listen, I’d encourage grabbing the Ogg Vorbis or MP3 versions as it will take far less time. I’d recommend you only download the FLAC if you are going to do some additional work on it.

My experiences with the Internet Archive have me considering posting FLAC versions of my own shows as a convenience for anyone who wants the raw audio for re-mixing. The uploads take quite a long time but the encoding time is pretty good and the only cost to use the Internet Archive is the time to get the files up there.

I was on one other panel, Podasting 101, which I did not record. That panel was held in the main track room, though, so odds are good it was recorded with the gear set up in that room and will be released via the Balticon Podcast.

TCLP 2009-06-03 Balticon 43: Technology, Podcasting’s Rocket Fuel

This is a feature cast.

In the intro a reminder that the 4th anniversary episode of the show is coming up, June 24th.  Please send me any recollections, thoughts, or well wishes you’d like me to share on that show.

There is no listener feedback this week.  There is also no hacker word of the week due to the length of the feature.

The feature this week is the recording of the Technology: Podcasting’s Rocket Fuel panel at Balticon 43.  I was joined by Steve Eley, Jim Van Verth and Chooch Schubert.

There are no detailed show notes this week.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

TCLP 2009-05-27 Balticon 43: Peer Media vs. Broadcast Media

This is a feature cast.

In the intro a heart felt thank you to my good friend, Chris Miller, for his support and advice without which my recent experience at Balticon would not have been anywhere near as phenomenal.

There is no listener feedback this week.  There is also no hacker word of the week due to the length of the feature.

The feature this week is the recording of the Peer Media vs. Broadcast Media panel at Balticon 43.  I was joined by Earl Newton, Dave Slusher and Patrick McLean all of whom I owe a debt of gratitude for this great discussion.  For clarification, the book Patrick mentions is “Against Intellectual Monopoly” by Michele Boldrin and David Levine.  Patrick also sent me a link to an interview with Boldrin which led me to the web site, Against Monopoly, which furthers the discussion with contributions from several other scholars.

Grab the detailed show notes with time offsets and additional links either as PDF or OPML.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

TCLP 2009-02-18 Copyright Panel at Farpoint

This is a feature cast.

There is no hacker word of the week this week due to the length of the feature.

The feature this week is a recording of the copyright panel I moderated at Farpoint this past weekend. Please bear with the audio quality as I used the unpowered mic that came with my record. I was joined in the discussion by Helen Madden (who mentions Epicon and ERWA), Paul Fischer and Martha Holloway of the Balticon Podcast and the ADDCast, Jared Axelrod of too many creative projects to name but notably the creator of my podcast’s cover art, J.R. Blackwell, an amazing photographer and writer as well, and aspiring writer Paulette Jaxton who also recently started the Form Letter Rejection Theater podcast.

The book I mention is “The Pirate’s Dilemma” and it was in the context of Gail Z. Martins forthcoming interview with me. I also mentioned the 75/22/3 rule, explored by PhD economics candidate David Blackburn. Doctorow’s Law, that I cited but never explained was coined by Andrew Savikas in his coverage of the Tools of Change conference: “If someone takes something that belongs to you, and puts a lock on it that you don’t have a key for, that lock isn’t in your best interests”. I also mentioned Bookworm which was covered at ToC. Paulette mentioned that she uses Fictionwise which may support ePub but I couldn’t find any clear and easier reference for such support.

Grab the detailed show notes with time offsets and additional links either as PDF or OPML.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.