Following Up for the Week Ending 9/26/2010

Following Up for the Week Ending 9/5/2010

Following Up for the Week Ending 7/11/2010

Following Up for the Week Ending 3/28/2010

National Broadband Plan Released by the FCC

The plan the FCC has been developing as mandated by Congress last year is finally out. Just trying to digest the executive summary it is apparent why the full plan was late. It is gargantuan at least in part due to the FCC’s earnest attempt to respond to public comment and input. It is going to take some time to complete a full analysis even by folks following this much more closely with far more expertise to bring to bear.

One aspect, the goal of affordability, already seems to be failing closer scrutiny. I saw this message forwarded to the NNSquad mailing list that finds little if any evidence for prices actually being directly decreased by the plan. The analysis is being vetted but if it is accurate, this is disappointing. The whole point of criticizing the early lack of attention on competition was to help drive down cost as well as to improve consumer choice. While the FCC has made some moves in the plan to better address those complaints–re-assessing wholesale regulations and improving transparency–there does not appear to be any direct action that would demonstrably make broadband more affordable, especially to the poor.

Despite concerns over hurdles the plan yet has to clear, what is important to note is that Congress still has time to further discuss the proposals and either adopt or abandon them as they start to make new law. If you want a more digestible view of what Congress will be considering, I recommend Nate Anderson’s preliminary analysis at Ars Technica.

FCC Order Opens Schools’ Internet Services

Matthew Lasar has the details at Ars. This actually seems fairly obvious, in retrospect, similar to the sort of public access to the internet we are already accustomed to finding in libraries. There is a safety element, though, that limits access to non-operational hours. While I am skeptical of the sort of parenting that I feel leads to exaggeration of threats on school grounds, I think there is another good reason for this limit. Those resources should be prioritized for the students, of course, and not be in contention during the school day.

To be honest, I’d just be happy of the schools that have wireless open that up since that could potentially be used without even entering school grounds.

TCLP 2010-01-10 News

This is news cast 202, an episode of The Command Line Podcast.

In the intro a shout out to SLUG and a huge thank you to Holger for his ongoing donation.

Also, if you are a listener, reader or acquaintance of Tee Morris’ and want to know how you can help in his time of need, you can donate to a fund for his daughter, participate in an auction schedule for next month, or buy one of his many excellent books.

This week’s security alerts are Adobe finally working on a software updater and 768-bit RSA modulus factored.

In this week’s news Jaron Lanier’s Web 2.0 rant, whether cheap tech undermines legal protections including broader ramifications for online privacy, testing the first build of Mozilla’s multi-process project which I first mentioned over six months ago, and the government is skeptical of an earlier suggestion that more wireless spectrum will increase broadband competition.

Following up this week Tenenbaum P2P case defending seeking to overturn damages as unconstitutional and FCC seeks extension for broadband plan.

Grab the detailed show notes with time offsets and additional links either as PDF or OPML. You can also grab the flac encoded audio from the Internet Archive.

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

TCLP 2009-12-20 News

This is news cast 201, an episode of The Command Line Podcast.

This week’s only security alerts is development of a counter tool to a forensics suite, COFEE, that Micrsoft offers but was leaked and the announcement to that counter tool, DECAF, was just a stunt.

In this week’s news an investigation into Monsanto’s predatory patent licensing practices brought to my attention via Glyn Moody’s comparison of the agri-giant to Microsoft, the latest developments with the Australian plan to filter net access including analysis of the test results they are claiming as a success, composeable icons for free software and open source licenses, and the first draft of the FCC’s broadband plan.

Following up this week just the news that the three strikes plan has returned in New Zealand despite its fundamental flaws.

Grab the detailed show notes with time offsets and additional links either as PDF or OPML. You can also grab the flac encoded audio from the Internet Archive.

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

TCLP 2009-12-06 News

This is news cast 199, an episode of The Command Line Podcast.

This week’s security alerts are malware may start affecting non-jailbroken iPhones and testing whether Google’s new DNS resolver is secure. I wrote about Google’s new offering earlier in the week.

In this week’s news latest ACTA leak seems to confirm the worst exceeding EU and Canadian copyright policy and makes better sense of KEI Director James Love’s encounter with USTR chief Ron Kirk, standalone JavaScript, historical antecedents to the current broadband regulation debate, and a new privacy reporting tool from the CDT which is part of a larger trend to try to improve awareness around online privacy.

Following up this week one British politician pushed back on the Digital Economy Bill and evaluating the censorship risk of the current version of the Google Books settlement.

Grab the detailed show notes with time offsets and additional links either as PDF or OPML. You can also grab the flac encoded audio from the Internet Archive.

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

First Programmable Quantum Computer, Droid Bug Turns Out Mostly Harmless, and More

  • Facebook set to enact its new privacy policy
    Jolie O’Dell has the story at RWW. This is the same draft they published after objections. Apparently not enough users commented to the point where it needed further amendment. Facebook is also claiming much of the feedback was positive.
  • Microsoft official launches Azure
    It won’t be available for general use until early next year according to Ars, but RWW describes the launch event at the Redmond giant’s annual developer gathering. I was surprised to read that Mullenweg of Auttomatic participated though if his claims that Azure runs PHP and MySQL are true, why not?
  • Spain institutes right to broadband
    This will be support apparently through he carrier with the universal service contract. The right would be to a minimum speed service at a regulated price. Spain follows Finland who released announced a similar, though more ambitious, proposal.
  • Rollover bug mistaken for remote control of Droid phones
    I’ve actually professionally encountered this sort of bug in a device, before, similar to what Wired uncovered. I am surprised that this made it into the Droid give its provenance. To counter Gruber’s comments about how the press and public would react differently if this was the iPhone, I’d offer that for quite a bit of the Droid’s software stack, the sources are open for skeptics to audit for themselves.
  • Issues with verifying recovery.gov data
    This post from the Sunlight Foundation is a good basis for tempering enthusiasm for raw or, as Lessig recently put it, naked transparency though for different reasons. Here Hanlon’s Law, the one about incompetence before malice, seems to be in full effect. It does beg the question of how we can improve or establish the checks and audits that would have caught this.
  • First programmable quantum computer
    I hadn’t realized that the prototypes I’ve been reading about for the last few years were so task specific. Casey Johnston has the story at Ars of a new NIST design that is much more directly comparable to the classical, general purpose computers with which most of us are familiar.
  • FCC takes on cable, satellite operators over broadband access
    Cecilia Kang at the Post shares a write up of an FCC presentation taking issue with the lack of innovation and choice with the current cable and satellite operators. My only concern is the focus on television as a network access device, I hope we see this same zeal applied to the lack of choices for traditional broadband, as well.
  • New incubator to help bring technologists, government together
    RWW has an excellent write up of Anil Dash’s newly announced venture. They especially do an excellent job of contrasting Expert Labs to Tim O’Reilly’s similar and perhaps complementary efforts in this space. My only question–Anil, are you hiring?