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feeds | grep links > Software as Evidence, Automating Game Ratings, DoJ Pushes for Warrant-less GPS Tracking, and More

  • Software as evidence
    Bruce Schneier points to some research by Sergey Bratus that looks into a question that many courts apparently take as already settled, whether software that automatically collects evidence should be considered trustworthy. Interesting to see trusted computing mentioned in the abstract but it clearly makes sense if the nearest analogy is physical chain of evidence. Digital information is ridiculously malleable, work like this should have come out much earlier and have been considered far more broadly.
  • ESRB to automate game ratings
    Slashdot’s description of the changes ESRB will be implementing are a hair misleading as there won’t be an expert system or other weak AI actually playing game titles to make determinations on suitable ratings (as much as I enjoy that image.) Rather, game makers will fill out electronic questionnaires which will be used primarily to derive ratings. The NYT article that is linked only mentions penalties for non-disclosure but what about false disclosure? The whole thing is a bit precarious anyway as the ESRB is run by a large trade organization, this is all in the name of self regulation in the hopes of avoiding intrusive legislation.
  • DoJ petitions US Supreme Court to allow warrant-less GPS tracking
    David Kravetz at Wired’s Threat Level has the details of the latest reasoning from the Justice Department in its appeal to the highest court in the land. Kravetz points to reasons why the court may favor the administration’s position, both in the from of supporting lower court rulings and the ubiquity of GPS devices. The petition seems to specifically highlight their use in law enforcement but I believe the other relevant case, involving IR based temperature sensors, spoke more to availability of new technology to the public as affecting what could be considered reasonable or unreasonable in a 4th Amendment context.
  • Open source programming tools on the rise, Slashdot
  • US, EU want to delay copyright treaty to help blind people 3-5 years, BoingBoing
  • Facebook launches new safety, security tools, ReadWriteWeb

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The Command Line by Thomas Gideon
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