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feeds | grep links > Desktop 3D Scanner, 64-Bit Flash for Linux, Diaspora Releases Source Code, and More

Another day of light posting between mental heavy lifting while coding for $employer and burning much of my usual end of day hour on a personal hacking project. The latter is an itch that had started to drive me insane, automating my podcast feed management to both reduce the amount of manual work around that task in my podcast work flow and to move the step entirely over to Linux. I’ll post more details of how I manage this later, including links to source.

  • Makerbot 3D scanner
    Bruce Sterling at Wired points out a new offering from the desktop printing and home fabrication innovators at Makerbot, a desktop 3D scanner. While it is likely to have similar limitations as its printer counterpart, it along with free and open source 3D design software completes the trifecta for not just ginning up your own tangible parts and goods but to designing and customizing them in the first place.
  • 3D printing commercial air craft parts, Make
  • IBM patents choose your own adventure movies, Slashdot
  • Adobe releases 64-bit Flash, including Linux version
    I’ve only had some minor trouble with Flash under Linux but this beta, as Slashdot points out, should eliminate all kinds of jiggery-pokery most 64-bit Linux users have to go through. I wish we didn’t have to keep supporting Flash, either with official builds or via free and open one offs but for online video it is still effectively king.
  • Diaspora releases source code
    The link is directly to their site which also includes a simple screen shot. I haven’t had time to download and test but have read elsewhere that this is really pre-alpha quality code. I would suggest holding off unless you are willing to help test and maybe even send along patches.
  • Law suit over another post-cookie tracking technique, Wired

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The Command Line by Thomas Gideon
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